Coronavirus in New York City – projects.thecity.nyc

Last updated:
Since March 2020, THE CITY has been tracking COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and fatalities in New York City. For the latest, follow THE CITY’s coronavirus coverage.
Deaths include test-confirmed cases as well as others with “COVID-19” or equivalent listed on the death certificate. The share of residents vaccinated counts the number of residents who have received at least one vaccine dose, divided by New York City’s estimated population as of 2019 (8,336,817), the year city health officials use for their measurements.
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: NYC deaths as of , NYC vaccinations as of
NYS Department of Health: NYC cases as of
The charts below show the number of tests performed at testing sites in New York City, as well as the positive test rate. A high positive test rate can indicate widespread prevalence of the virus or insufficient testing, depending on case and testing rates.

“Tests” counts the number of individuals tested per day, including PCR tests and antigen tests reported to the state. Data is for NYC residents. State case and test numbers differ from those reported by the city health department due to different collection and reporting methodologies.
NYS Department of Health: cases and tests as of
Sign up and get the latest stories from THE CITY delivered to you each morning
COVID-19 hospitalizations show the caseload faced by hospitals and indicate the number of serious cases of COVID, independent of test rates.
Some people hospitalized with COVID were initially admitted for other reasons. Starting in January 2022, New York began reporting the number of people admitted due to COVID or complications of COVID, shown as “admitted for COVID” below.

NYS Department of Health: hospitalizations as of , reason for admission as of
The following chart shows the number of confirmed and probable deaths from COVID-19 in New York City by date of death.

Deaths include test-confirmed cases as well as others with “COVID-19” or equivalent listed on the death certificate. Data is shown by date of death and released by the city health department on a 3-day lag. Recent data is incomplete, and counts will increase as more deaths are reported.
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: deaths as of
Read the stories of some who died from the coronavirus — and help THE CITY tell the stories of thousands more.
Below are cumulative counts of cases and deaths by borough, and cases, deaths, vaccinations and tests for New York City, New York State, and the United States.
Deaths include test-confirmed cases as well as deaths reported as “probable.” Vaccinations represent the number of individuals who have received at least one vaccine dose. Tests are the number of individuals tested per day.
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: NYC deaths as of , NYC vaccinations as of
NYS Department of Health: NYC cases and tests as of , NYS tests as of
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: NYS vaccinations as of , US vaccinations as of , US tests as of
Johns Hopkins University: NYS cases and deaths as of , US cases and deaths as of
The numbers belows show how many New York City residents have received at least one dose of a COVID vaccine, the number of residents fully vaccinated, and the number of booster shots administered to residents. New York City’s population was 8,336,817 as of 2019, the year city health officials use for their measurements.
7-day averages as of
7-day averages as of
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: vaccinations as of , boosters as of , cases and age-adjusted hospitalizations as of
The following map and table show the number of test-diagnosed cases over the past seven days per every 100,000 residents in each ZIP code.

Data is shown by modified ZIP code tabulation area, used by the city health department to report health data.
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: cases as of
Developed by Will Welch, data reporting by Ann Choi, Josefa Velasquez, Yoav Gonen and Suhail Bhat, edited by Alyssa Katz.

source

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*